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FILM STUDIES

In the Film Studies program you learn about the art and craft of filmmaking in addition to the history and theory behind film.

Introducing the new Film Studies major, starting in Fall 2016! Building on the past 15 years of offering film courses as part of our Film Studies minor, the Communication Arts department is excited to announce the new Film Studies major, which will train students in all aspects of the filmmaking process, from screenwriting to post-production, from the history of film to the newest trends in the industry. More information about this exciting, new program will be added shortly.

Other opportunities include the Union Film Society as well as the Union Film Festival.

Film Studies major: 45 hours (15 classes)

Required courses: 15 hours (5 courses)

An introductory study of the techniques of theatre and film, designed as a foundational study to make play and movie going more meaningful and better appreciated. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered in the Fall and Spring.
An introduction to the scholarly aesthetic analysis and study of cinema teaching students the critical skills involved in the interpretation of film. Includes a foundational study of forms, functions and history of film arts to develop appreciation and skill in analysis. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: None. Offered every Odd Fall semester.
A survey of current industry practices and careers in the entertainment industry. Students will learn about the professional guilds; the core business configuration of the film/television industry; and professional expectations in the entertainment industry. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: None. Offered every Even Spring semester.
The key to every great film is a great script.  Screenwriters need to be adept at not only conceptualizing a film, but also conveying that idea to the industry, and, most importantly, putting pen to paper and writing a script that rings true with layered characters, meaningful conflict, and authentic dialogue. This course will allow students to consume important and transcendent screenplays and explore the journey from idea to finished script. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: ENG 312.
The legal controls and government regulations on mass media. Students will study case precedents involving the freedom and rights of the press and broadcasters.Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Offered in the Spring.

Production Electives: Select 9 hours (3 classes) from


An introductory course to visual storytelling using a variety of digital media. Students will learn to create and deliver compelling and emotionally engaging narratives for a variety of purposes, combining video, still images, audio and interactivity. Credit hours: 3. Pre-requisites: None. Offered in the Fall and Spring.
Stagecraft is designed to introduce the students to the basic production elements of technical theatre such as scenery and prop construction, lighting and sound rigging, and scenic painting. This course is predominately hands-on, so the student will be immersed in a practical and authentic theatrical production experience. Credit hours: 3. Pre-requisites: None. Offered in the Fall–Alternate Years.
Overview of the elements of production: cameras, sound, lighting, and videotape recording using a switcher. Students work with these in producing television programs. Credit hours: 3. Pre-requisites: None. Offered in the Fall.
Design, installation and use of stage lighting, sound, and other technical elements of theatre productions. Credit hours: 3. Pre-requisites: None. Offered every Even Spring semester.
Focused on the narrative style of storytelling, this course will expand students’ understanding of the technical, theoretical and aesthetic issues inherent to time-based media, with specific focus on the role of Christians in media. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: COM 220. Offered in the Fall of even years.
The art of the director, culminating in production of a one-act play by each student. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: COM 240. Offered in the Fall of even years.

Performance Electives: Select 6 hours (2 classes) from


Study and development of the voice with exercises in articulation and pronunciation. Seeks to evaluate vocal weaknesses and provide students with the tools to improve their voices. A special unit emphasizes improving regionalisms and southern dialect. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered in the Fall.
Various acting theories and practices with emphasis on exercises in physical training, vocal reproduction, character projection, and the aesthetics of acting. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: COM 123. Offered in the Spring. 
Development of professional vocal, visual, personality, and performance skills by use of simulated newscasts, interviews, and script narrations. Credit hours: 3. Pre-requisites: None. Offered in the Spring.
Advanced acting characterization, historical styles, and improvisational techniques. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: COM 240. Offered in the Fall, Odd Years.

History Elective: Select one class from


A historical survey of motion pictures with emphasis on major movements, genres, and themes in narrative film from the early silent era, early talking pictures, the studio system, and post-classical cinema. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered every Odd Spring semester.
A historical survey of animated motion pictures from the medium’s pre-history through the modern era in America and abroad. Emphasis will be placed on the major movements, genres, and themes in narrative film from the silent era, early talking pictures, the studio system, and post-classical cinema. Lectures and class discussions are accompanied by screenings of appropriate films. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered every Even Spring semester.

Theory Electives: Select 6 hours (2 classes) from


An examination of how films as stories convey faith or alternative responses to God as latent aspects of the total film experience. Includes an exploration of how explicit a film may be about faith or another ideological position without losing its credibility as a film. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered every Even Fall semester.
This course explores the subtle uses of symbolism in presenting sub textual messages. Students view and analyze a variety of films and taped theatre productions. Credit Hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered as needed.
This class will strive to examine the overall perspective, position, and point of view of the content and images as well as the vision and values within Peter Weir’s body of work. Credit Hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered as needed.
The practice and patterns of censorship in cinema. Issues include local and state censorship boards, legal challenges, organized public pressure, and self-regulatory efforts by the industry. The use of film as propaganda, including Soviet cinema theory, Nazi film propaganda, and American use of film in supporting war efforts will be considered. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered as needed.
 An examination of the intersection of film and literary texts and the scholarly analyses of each narrative format. Discussion includes cultural and historical aspects, philosophical approaches to adaptation, and the technical analysis of film. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: ENG 201 & 202. Offered as needed.
 An examination of philosophical themes as developed in film with special attention given to existentialism, nihilism, pragmatism, phenomenalism, and postmodernism. Credit hours: 3. Prerequsites: None. Recommended: PHL 240. Offered as needed.
 The impact of film on the politics and thinking of American society towards concepts such as war, peace, race, regions of the world and political ideas. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisites: None. Offered as needed.

Practical Electives: Complete 6 hours (2 class) from


Selected students are assigned as interns to obtain supervised, practical real-life work experiences. It is not a job per se; it is a learning opportunity having direct relationship to the student’s program of study and career interests. Course may be repeated for credit. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: Permission of Chair. Offered in the Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer.
Practical hands-on experience in communications. Students work with a faculty member on specific projects related to one of the various media productions to enhance their knowledge and expertise in their major. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 semester hours. Credit hours: 3. Prerequisite: Instructor’s Consent. Offered in the Fall and Spring.

Film Studies minor

The film studies minor has two different tracks:

Track one focuses on the study of film with classes in film theory, film history and faith & culture in film.

Track two focuses on the filmmaking process and includes a semester-long study at the Los Angeles Film Studies Center, a program sponsored by the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. During the course of the semester, students at LAFSC write, shoot and edit short films while interning at studios and production companies in Hollywood.

Track One: 18 hours (6 classes)

 An introduction to the scholarly aesthetic analysis and study of media teaching students the critical skills involved in the understanding and interpretation of media messages. Includes a foundational study of the forms, functions, and history of media arts to develop appreciation and skill in analysis. Credit hours: 3.
 Historical survey of motion pictures with emphasis on major movements, genres, and themes in narrative film from the early silent era, early talking pictures, the studio system, and post-classical cinema. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of how films as stories convey faith or alternative responses to God as latent aspects of the total film experience. Includes an exploration of how explicit a film may be about faith or another ideological position without losing its credibility as a film. Credit hours: 3.

Film Studies Electives: Select 9 hours (3 classes) from

This course explores the subtle uses of symbolism in presenting sub textual messages. Students view and analyze a variety of films and taped theatre productions. Credit Hours: 3. Offered in the Winter.
 The practice and patterns of censorship in cinema. Issues include local and state censorship boards, legal challenges, organized public pressure, and self-regulatory efforts by the industry. The use of film as propaganda, including Soviet cinema theory, Nazi film propaganda, and American use of film in supporting war efforts will be considered. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of the intersection of film and literary texts and the scholarly analyses of each narrative format. Discussion includes cultural and historical aspects, philosophical approaches to adaptation, and the technical analysis of film. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of philosophical themes as developed in film with special attention given to existentialism, nihilism, pragmatism, phenomenalism, and postmodernism. Credit hours: 3.
 The impact of film on the politics and thinking of American society towards concepts such as war, peace, race, regions of the world and political ideas. Credit hours: 3.

Track Two: 22 hours (7 classes)

 An introduction to the scholarly aesthetic analysis and study of media teaching students the critical skills involved in the understanding and interpretation of media messages. Includes a foundational study of the forms, functions, and history of media arts to develop appreciation and skill in analysis. Credit hours: 3.

Film Studies Elective: Select 3 hours (1 class) from

This course explores the subtle uses of symbolism in presenting sub textual messages. Students view and analyze a variety of films and taped theatre productions. Credit Hours: 3. Offered in the Winter.
 Historical survey of motion pictures with emphasis on major movements, genres, and themes in narrative film from the early silent era, early talking pictures, the studio system, and post-classical cinema. Credit hours: 3.
 The practice and patterns of censorship in cinema. Issues include local and state censorship boards, legal challenges, organized public pressure, and self-regulatory efforts by the industry. The use of film as propaganda, including Soviet cinema theory, Nazi film propaganda, and American use of film in supporting war efforts will be considered. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of how films as stories convey faith or alternative responses to God as latent aspects of the total film experience. Includes an exploration of how explicit a film may be about faith or another ideological position without losing its credibility as a film. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of the intersection of film and literary texts and the scholarly analyses of each narrative format. Discussion includes cultural and historical aspects, philosophical approaches to adaptation, and the technical analysis of film. Credit hours: 3.
 An examination of philosophical themes as developed in film with special attention given to existentialism, nihilism, pragmatism, phenomenalism, and postmodernism. Credit hours: 3.
 The impact of film on the politics and thinking of American society towards concepts such as war, peace, race, regions of the world and political ideas. Credit hours: 3.

Los Angeles Film Studies Center: 16 hrs.

 Check with the Communication Arts Department, the Institute for International and Intercultural Studies for details or lafsc.bestsemester.com.